Is your Webstream play-by-play a radio or TV demo?

Many play-by-play announcers broadcast their games on video Webstreams. If there’s only a single camera, some broadcasters will lean towards doing a radio call. Because there’s a picture, others will use more of a TV style.

Do you then use that game on your radio demo or your TV demo?

It depends on how you did the play-by-play.

If you did it as a true TV call where you simply provided captions to the pictures, it will be great on your TV demo. If instead you described the pictures in detail, then it’s better used as a radio call.

Commit to one style for the broadcast

A common problem is many folks who do a single camera Webstream live in no man’s land between radio and TV play-by-play. It ends up that there’s not enough description for radio and there’s too much talking for television.

When you do a play-by-play Webcast, commit to doing it either as radio or TV.

By committing, you’re certain to have something to take from that broadcast and into the job market.

Remove streaming video from a radio style call

If you do use your Webstream as a radio broadcast, be sure you put only the audio on your demo. Including video leads an employer to wonder if your intention was to do a radio or TV call. Remove the video and eliminate the confusion.

Does a Webstream count as a TV demo?

Many employers will not evaluate a single camera Webstream play-by-play as true TV work. There’s no need for you to watch a monitor between plays to know what your audience is seeing, there are no replays to address and there is no one in your ear shouting instructions while you are talking. At the same time, employers can at least see if you have ability.

Some employers will hire you based on ability versus experience. Even if they don’t think you’re ready today, you’ve opened the door to show them your improvement in the coming months.

If a single camera Webstream is all you have to submit for a TV play-by-play position, it’s worth taking the shot