Top 20 sports broadcasting schools

It’s been five years since we published our list of the top five sports broadcasting schools in the U.S. It’s been nine years since our initial Top 20 ranking in 2013.

It’s time to update the list.

The list of top sports broadcasting schools has remained largely the same over the past decade. There are some new additions, and some schools have risen or fallen slightly. Still, though, largely the same.

Excellence is rooted in consistency.

Traits of top sports broadcasting schools:

1. Quality instruction

The best instructors are those who are, or have been, sports broadcasters.

2. Campus radio and/or TV stations

Having a place to get reps is mandatory. A perk of Big 10, SEC and ACC schools is being in conferences whose TV networks provide professional-quality broadcast opportunities for students.

3. Alumni involvement

The best schools have alumni who return to campus to mentor, teach, and help graduates get jobs.

Read our 2017 ranking of the Top 5 sports broadcasting schools for more tips on what to look for when choosing a good one.

The Top 20 sports broadcasting schools:

  1. Syracuse
  2. Arizona State
  3. Ball State
  4. Notre Dame
  5. Virginia Tech
  6. Indiana
  7. Ohio U.
  8. Missouri
  9. Oklahoma State
  10. Maryland
  11. St. Cloud State
  12. Penn State
  13. Bradley
  14. Northwestern
  15. Kansas
  16. Miami
  17. Hofstra
  18. Florida
  19. Ohio State
  20. Fordham

Honorable Mention top sports broadcasting schools

Schools are listed in alphabetical order.

  1. Emerson
  2. Gonzaga
  3. Iowa
  4. Ithaca
  5. Michigan State
  6. NAU
  7. Oregon
  8. TCU
  9. Washington State

A special note about Big Ten, SEC and ACC schools

Schools in the Big Ten, SEC and ACC are worth an additional look, regardless of their placement on our lists. The reason, as mentioned at the top of this page, is because of the relationships they have with their respective conference broadcast networks. Each of the three conferences streams broadcasts produced entirely by students, including the on-air talent.

The games are in big-time settings and the production quality is high. Everyone steps their game up and it looks great on a demo reel.

Since the webcasts reflect the quality of each school’s sports broadcasting curriculum, these schools generally provide excellent classroom instruction.

Schools with a sports broadcasting, sports communications or sports media major

These schools take the education of sports broadcasters seriously enough that they’ve created majors, or at least sports media concentrations, that are more specialized than a general broadcasting major.

Schools are listed in alphabetical order.

  1. Arizona State
  2. Austin Peay
  3. Belhaven
  4. Clemson
  5. Evansville
  6. Indiana
  7. Ithaca
  8. Marist
  9. Marshall
  10. Morehouse
  11. Nebraska
  12. Newman
  13. Oklahoma State
  14. South Carolina
  15. South Dakota
  16. Southeastern Louisiana
  17. Syracuse
  18. TCU
  19. Texas
  20. Waynesburg
  21. Western Illinois

Two more factors to consider when choosing a sports broadcasting school

Geography

You can’t put a price on happiness. Choose to live someplace you are going to enjoy.

Cost

Not every school is going to be in everyone’s budget. Don’t sweat it, though. Read on . . .

You can launch a successful sports broadcasting career from anywhere. Though a ton of sportscasters have graduated from Syracuse, their number is far surpassed by sportscasters who went elsewhere.

Your success will depend upon the degree to which you take advantage of the opportunities provided to you. If you are at a school where the quality of instruction is less, seek outside mentors. If you aren’t getting the reps you want, create your own opportunities doing webcasts of local high school and small college games.

Success will depend most upon the opportunities you create for yourself beyond the school curriculum, having mentors to critique your work and what you do with the opportunities you are given.

The most successful sportscasters are the most invested — the most disciplined and hard working.

I’m glad to help

We’ve advised hundreds of students — and parents of students — about what colleges might be best for them.

Do you have questions or comments?  Please leave them below. I enjoy helping!

Jon Chelesnik,
Owner, STAA

133 Comments. Leave new

  • What about Lipscomb University for Sports Broadcasting? It looks like they have a good program but they are not listed here. Any thoughts?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 6, 2023 3:30 pm

      (I’m sorry for my late reply. It’s due to my ignorance regarding the new spam filtering software on our website. I’m still pleased to reply even though it’s likely too late to be of use).

      I’ve met just one sportscaster from Lipscomb. That is an indication to me that their program might not be on par with the nation’s best. However, that one sportscaster graduated just back in 2021 and was fairly well-prepared for the job market.

      Reply
  • What do you think about Fairfield University?

    Reply
  • What do you know about Marist?

    Reply
  • Do you know anything about Canisius College, Niagara University or Saint Bonaventure?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 6, 2023 3:41 pm

      (I’m sorry for my late reply. It’s due to my ignorance regarding the new spam filtering software on our website. I’m still pleased to reply even though it’s likely too late to be of use).

      Glad to chime-in on those schools:

      * Fordham. One of the oldest sports broadcasting programs in the country. That means a strong alumni network; that’s always helpful when students seek mentors and when grads hit the job market. The caliber of instruction is also strong.

      * Marist. Good, though not great. Their grads aren’t quite as polished as students from the top schools. Still, the fact that they have a sports broadcasting, sports communications or sports media major is meaningful.

      * Fairfield & Niagara. The fact that I didn’t know they have a broadcasting program doesn’t speak well to it’s possible place among the elite.

      * Canisius. 2023 grad Griffin DellaPenna is quite talented. A large part of that is because he’s a quality person but the school also earns credit. On the flip side, he is the first sportscaster I’ve come across from Canisius.

      * St. Bonaventure. Might have the second best broadcasting program on the list of schools you asked about. Seem to be stronger in producing TV sportscasters than radio.

      Reply
      • Thank you for your response.

        If you had a choice between Hofstra, Ithaca or Duquesne. How would you rank them?

        Reply
        • Hofstra and Ithaca are close. Hofstra’s history, and likely larger alumni network within the industry, might give them an edge. A person won’t go wrong with either.

          Reply
  • My son would like to do sports broadcasting. I am trying to find options for this.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 6, 2023 3:42 pm

      (I’m sorry for my late reply. It’s due to my ignorance regarding the new spam filtering software on our website. I’m still pleased to reply even though it’s likely too late to be of use).

      The lists on this page are a great starting point for exploration. How old is your son?

      Reply
  • Samantha Galuris
    March 17, 2023 6:32 am

    Thank you for providing this list of the top sports media schools.
    I am very interested in attending South Carolina. Are you aware of any contacts or scholarships I can reach out to or apply for.
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 6, 2023 3:44 pm

      (I’m sorry for my late reply. It’s due to my ignorance regarding the new spam filtering software on our website. I’m still pleased to reply even though it’s likely too late to be of use).

      Were you able to gain the info you sought about South Carolina?

      Reply
  • What’s your opinion on the U of Georgia sportscasting certificate?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 6, 2023 3:45 pm

      (I’m sorry for my late reply. It’s due to my ignorance regarding the new spam filtering software on our website. I’m still pleased to reply even though it’s likely too late to be of use).

      Georgia has a strong program for sportscasters, especially for aspiring TV sports anchor/reporters.

      Reply
  • Thank you for the list, any insight on university of michigan?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 6, 2023 3:50 pm

      (I’m sorry for my late reply. It’s due to my ignorance regarding the new spam filtering software on our website. I’m still pleased to reply even though it’s likely too late to be of use).

      Michigan has a healthy enrollment in their program. From what I’ve seen, though, their students are not as strong in the fundamentals as the top schools. The program at Michigan State seems to be ahead of that at Michigan.

      Reply
  • Mark Robbins
    April 12, 2023 6:10 pm

    Hi, Jon —

    First of all, thank you for the helpful rankings and comments that you put together. It is helping significantly as my son Caleb now decides on where to go to college this fall. He is fortunate to have been admitted to Indiana U.’s Media School, Michigan State’s School of Communications, Ohio U’s Scripps School and Ithaca College’s Sports Media program. He is waitlisted at Syracuse Newhouse. We live in Michigan. All things being equal, he’d choose Indiana from among where he’s been admitted. He had a great visit to the Media School last month, and also is drawn to the Big Ten atmosphere and opportunities. He is interested broadly both in sports broadcasting and journalism. The catch is that each school, either being in state or having extended generous financial packages, other than Indiana, will cost somewhere between $23,000-$30,000 in total. Indiana would cost around $51,000. We have the money saved up in 529s to cover Caleb for that expense, and he’s likely not going to go to graduate school, so it’s there to be used. Still, how much greater value do you believe Indiana would bring to Caleb’s sports media education than Michigan State or Ohio? He’s sort of ruled Ithaca out because it doesn’t offer the big college social environment that Caleb wants. Thank you very much for any thoughts you may have. Sincerely, Mark Robbins, 248-881-3826

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 6, 2023 3:52 pm

      (I’m sorry for my late reply. It’s due to my ignorance regarding the new spam filtering software on our website. I’m still pleased to reply even though it’s likely too late to be of use).

      You and I have corresponded at length since you posted here, so I won’t rehash all of it. What school did Caleb end up choosing?

      Reply
  • What are your thoughts on Dean college now that John Rooke is there?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 13, 2023 11:47 am

      Hi Pari. Thank you for your question.

      I am a big fan of John’s, as an instructor, broadcaster and person. He teaches his students well.

      When John was at Emerson, they were cranking out quality sportscasters. Dean is doing okay but has yet to reach that point. It’s understandable, though, because John started Dean’s sportscasting program from scratch. Emerson has a long track record.

      Dean has students working in the Cape League, NECBL and Futures League, in minor league hockey, in college sports at Dean and at other nearby schools who don’t have broadcasting on their campus.

      They also have academic partnerships with the Patriots, Revolution, Providence Bruins, WooSox.

      An up-and-coming program certainly worthy of consideration.

      Reply
  • Thank you for this list. I looked over this post and your post and follow up questions from your 2013 list. A number of years ago you were saying that you hadn’t really heard of many successful grads from Univ. of MD – College Park in the field. What changed your mind to put them at #10 on your new list?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      July 20, 2023 7:58 am

      Great question about Maryland, Lynn. My change of opinion about the Terps is based upon how much more familiar I’ve become with their program over the past decade. Perhaps they’ve been strong for a long time and I simply lacked sufficient familiarity with them. Or maybe their program has simply improved over the past decade. Whatever the reason, their program is currently strong!

      Reply
  • My son will be a senior in HS this fall and interested in sports broadcasting. I’m curious why Notre Dame ranks 4 on your list. I know they have a journalism program, but I see nothing about sports broadcasting within the curriculum. Thoughts?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      August 1, 2023 11:55 am

      Hi Diane. Notre Dame is quality over quantity. They don’t crank out sportscasters in large numbers, but they do produce them in great quality. Off the top of my head in recent years: Jack Collinsworth, Mike Golic Jr., Caroline Pineda and Mike Monaco to name a few of the highest profile ones. Conor Clingen and David Korzeniowski are up-and-comers. And I know there are others I am leaving out.

      Reply
  • What do you think about Springfield College in Massachusetts?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      August 1, 2023 11:49 am

      Hi Rick. Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, I lack any insight into Springfield College.

      Reply
  • Thank you for this information Jon. What are your thoughts regarding the growing conference consolidation and its impact on the rankings of these programs. For example if the ACC disbands over next 2-3 years how do you see Syracuse Miami Virginia Tech broadcasting programs being affected? Thoughts on impact on resources? Am I overthinking or valid concern? Specifically curious on Syracuse as Vtech and Miami may be attractive to Sec or big 10. Syracuse maybe not. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      August 4, 2023 8:10 am

      Fabulous question, Chris. Conference affiliation doesn’t impact the quality of a school’s sports broadcasting program. The money earned from conference affiliation stays within the athletic department. Strong broadcasting programs like the ones you mentioned are so because of the investments those schools make in their facilities, opportunities and, most importantly, people. The outstanding instructors at schools like Syracuse, Virginia Tech, Arizona State, etc. will stay regardless of conference affiliation.

      Again, that is a very cool question, Chris. Feel free to ask follow-ups if you have them.

      Reply
      • Thank you again Jon.

        Quick update. My son is a hs senior wanting to pursue sports broadcasting and has identified his top 4 as Penn State Maryland South Carolina and Syracuse. He is still
        Awaiting word on Syracuse but has gotten accepted to the others.

        Our take is Syracuse has the biggest “brand” (it is also the most expensive) but its instructors and facilities are top notch. Penn State seems to be strong option too especially with its vast alumni network and the fact we are reside in PA.

        Can you provide any color on Maryland and it’s high ranking in your list for sports broadcasting? Its journalism school is top notch but the sports broadcasting program seems much smaller than Syracuse and Penn State. One thing we are considering in its favor is its proximity to Washington DC and Baltimore for more internship opptys during the school year. But Syracuse and Penn State seem to really be tied into providing its undergraduates exposure to big events like the superbowl, World Cup, olympics etc.

        Any comments or insights on these programs would be appreciated as we look to make a final decision. Thank you!

        Reply
        • Jon Chelesnik
          March 8, 2024 10:48 am

          Hi Chris. Congratulations to your son on earning admission to three great programs in PSU, South Carolina and Maryland. And hopefully Syracuse will be yet another option.

          A huge plus for Maryland is its affiliation with Big Ten Network Students U. It gives their students fabulous opportunities on broadcasts with high-quality production. While I’m not familiar with other details about Maryland’s program, they have “scoreboard.” In other words, they just keep cranking out graduates who get sportscasting jobs. It is very much my observation, though, that their strength is developing TV sports anchor/reporters. I notice far fewer radio folks.

          Regarding internships, they don’t have to come during the school year. Summer internships at a station close to home are just as valuable and don’t conflict with a student’s school schedule and studies.

          Reply
          • Thank you Jon! Please ignore the question I submitted earlier today. You answered everything here. I appreciate your help!

          • Jon Chelesnik
            March 11, 2024 2:40 pm

            You’re very welcome, Chris. Glad to answer more questions when you have them.

  • If my son is more interested in the camera and production side of broadcasting rather than talent-in-front-of-the-screen, what would you recommend? We are looking at ASU, U of Florida, South Carolina. He is also interested in digital media content creation. Thoughts on these schools and other options? He is a strong student who would like a warmer climate and a bigger school. Which of these do you like, and where else to look for camera/production/digital media content creation?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      August 9, 2023 1:53 pm

      Hi Amy! TCU is a great school for your son to consider. They have an outstanding department head in Chuck LaMendola and a partnership with a regional sports TV network where students get opportunities in production. They do produce on-air talent but they especially excel at the production side. Fort Worth is largely warm weather, too.

      Most sports broadcasting, sports communications or sports media majors today include digital media content creation. That includes, of course, ASU, South Carolina and the other schools on the list above featuring that same tile

      Let me know if you have more questions. I enjoy answering them.

      Reply
      • Thank you very much, Jon. What do you think about University of Florida or Auburn on the TV production side? My son is accepted at ASU but waiting to hear from Florida, South Carolina, and Auburn. TCU is likely on the expensive side for us (another of our sons got in there and got very little merit aid). Any other TV production program recommendations at medium sized schools?

        Reply
        • You’re welcome, Amy!

          Northern Arizona U. has an outstanding TV production program and is likely much more affordable than TCU. The head of the program is a fabulous guy named Rory Faust. He would gladly answer questions you might have about their program.

          Most schools that have a healthy program for TV sportscasters also excel in production instruction. Students work together in front of, and behind, the camera. Florida, South Carolina and Auburn certainly fit into that category. I would even rank them in that order, if forced to. Really, though, it’s splitting hairs. All three are similarly strong and would be great choices.

          There is a strong chance that a college grad gets their first job in the state where they attended school. Therefore, your son might consider where he would like to live upon graduating — Florida, South Carolina, Alabama, Arizona, etc.

          Reply
  • Our son is a rising senior in high school and wants to pursue sports broadcasting in college. His list is Syracuse, Ithaca, Fordham, Seton Hall, Rowan, Virginia Tech, and University of Florida. Trying to be diverse with state vs. private and admission criteria. We live in NJ and were quite impressed with Seton Hall. Bob Ley and Bob Picozzi are both alumni. Wondering your thoughts on this list and specifically Seton Hall. Virginia Tech also looks quite appealing but we haven’t visited the campus yet. Thank you for your input.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      August 14, 2023 11:40 am

      Thank you for your question, Steve. I am unfamiliar with the program at Rowan, but the rest of your list is strong.

      Syracuse and VaTech are among the best in the nation. Not coincidentally, the head of the Tech program — Bill Roth — is a Syracuse alumnus. He’s also a fabulous instructor. Fordham has one of the nation’s deepest sports broadcasting traditions. Florida is strong, especially if your son wants to pursue TV more than radio. I’m a fan of instructor Jeremy Menard at Ithaca because I’m seeing the folks he is cranking out of there and I’ve known him for many years. Seton Hall is more middling, though grads John Fanta and Clayton Collier are both doing well in TV.

      Reply
      • Thank you for your response, Jon. The information you provide here is invaluable. Our son just got his acceptance letter and merit award from Seton Hall. Just a brief follow up on the Rowan program. Neil Hartman is the director there. He has worked in the Philadelphia market for 30+ years. Good internships and connections with many Philly area teams.

        Reply
        • Hi Steve,

          Congratulations to your son. That is great news!

          Thank you for the info about the program at Rowan. It is certainly helpful.

          Happy holiday season!

          Jon

          Reply
  • Hi! My son is a rising high school senior in Vermont. He grew up in MD and has always been interested in sports. He has looked at Marist, Fairfield, Sacred Heart, Curry, and Sienna, and numerous colleges for his older brother. Our other son, the older brother, is a sophomore at the College of the Holy Cross. He is dual majoring in Political Science and English. He has been interviewing, writing for blogs and the newspaper, and calling games for Holy Cross on the radio and loving Holy Cross. We hope to find a good fit for our middle son. Our middle son is a different student and prefers to watch and listen verses reading and writing. He works hard and is capable of accomplishing anything because he has great work ethic. I hope to one day see and or hear them together on the radio or tv. We would like to have our middle son 3 1/2 hours away or so. Has Ithica really changed a lot because back in the late 80’s I don’t recall it having a great reputation? How does Sacred Heart rank? Holy Cross? Any other schools that have good learning support and a good program?
    Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      August 17, 2023 8:31 am

      Hi Jo. It sounds like you’ve had a full house over the years!

      I wasn’t familiar with Ithaca in the late 80’s. And outside their sports broadcasting program, I don’t know what their reputation is today. The sports broadcasting program, though, has been elevated since Jeremy Menard joined the staff last decade. Of the school’s you’ve referenced, they are easily the best for sportscasting.

      I believe Sacred Heart has a sports Communication & Media/Broadcasting major. That’s a good thing. However, I know of multiple folks who have transferred out of the program to complete their sports broadcasting pursuits at schools like Hofstra, Seton Hall and others. It is my observation that graduates of the program are less prepared for the job market than graduates from many other programs.

      Holy Cross is a fine school, but there are much better options for aspiring sportscasters.

      Reply
  • Thank you for this helpful list and the great insight you offer as answers to our questions!

    I have a rising high school sophomore who wants to pursue a career in sports broadcasting. For the past two summers, he’s completed a 1-week sports broadcasting camp run by a company that offers it at college campuses across the U.S. (they’re not affiliated with any college/university program).

    I’d like to help him continue skill building and want to get him into a more robust program next summer, maybe one that is affiliated with a strong collegiate program. Can you offer any insight into the best pre-college sports broadcasting programs available to high school students? Location is not a limitation for us. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      August 25, 2023 8:19 am

      Hi Julie,

      It sounds like your son has attended Jeremy Treatman’s sportscasting camps. He’s been hosting them for a long time and, from what I’ve gathered, does a terrific job. Props to your son for his ambition.

      Yours is an interesting question about pre-college sports broadcasting programs that might be affiliated with a strong college program. Arizona State has done something the past few summers, but I don’t know if it is open to non-ASU students. If you will email me at jon@staatalent.com, I’ll send you contact info for a person at ASU who would know.

      The ASU summer program might be just for play-by-play broadcasters. In what aspects of sportscasting is your son interested?

      Jon

      Reply
      • Thanks so much. Yes that’s the one…my son really enjoyed it both summers. He attended at a different campus each time and found the experience was slightly different and impacted by the equipment the hosting campus has. We absolutely recommend the program to anyone considering it. I’ll email you about ASU – thanks for your contact info, much appreciated!

        Reply
        • Hi Julie. It’s neat to hear about how the camp experience differs, but is always good, based upon the location. I didn’t know that. Very cool!

          Reply
    • My son is a sophomore currently as well and I would love more info on the camps your son has done. We have looked into these three that our college advisor recommended – ASU, UCLA and Wake Forest – they all offer summer camps for broadcasting.

      Reply
  • Hi! My son is a HS Sophomore interested in a career in sports broadcasting. He attended Play by Play Sports Broadcasting camp over the summer and loved it. We are just beginning our college search and have many of the names on our list that you have discussed – Emerson, Marist, Hofstra etc. Here in NJ Rowan University has a huge Sports Media program. My son however would like a New England school as he is a New England Sports Fan – What can you recommend besides Emerson? URI? UConn? I wish there was a Seton Hall/Rowan/Montclair type school in Boston (campus, strong sports school, sports media degree).

    Reply
    • Hi Leslie. Boston College might be worth a look. I know of at least two TV sportscasters who graduated from BC, Julia Morris and Prescott Rossi. There are certainly more. Northeastern has a terrific program, especially if hockey is among your son’s interests. UCONN is a great school, but not so much for aspiring sports broadcasters.

      Reply
    • Hi Jon,
      Circling back as we have been taking a deeper dive into the college search since I emailed last. My son has zoned in on Dean College for a number of reasons and I saw your comments regarding John Rooke. My son has been calling the games at his high school and is interested in attending Dean’s summer broadcasting program taught by John. My question is does it mean more about who you study with and the specific degree (Dean offers a degree in Sports Broadcasting as opposed to say Penn State that only offers a certificate in sports Journalism) rather than the caliber of the school? A small school like Dean vs. Ithaca or Syracuse…

      Reply
      • Hi Leslie,

        I place considerably less value on the specific degree and tremendous value on who teaches it. The sports broadcasting instructors at some schools have never been sportscasters. The thing I love about John Rooke is that he has enjoyed an exceptional on-air sports broadcasting career. And he’s a great dude who cares deeply about providing his students with quality instruction and opportunities.

        Reply
  • Hey Jon. I am a High School senior in Michigan and currently applying to college and wanting to major in Sports Media, Broadcasting, and Journalism. I am weighing my options and am deciding between Michigan State University and the University of Kansas, Central Michigan University, and a few others. From what I have already researched, KU’s broadcasting program has a much more in depth, sports-focused area of the program while MSU and Central seems to be more news radio/television focused, and not so much sports. KU’s athletics are also very enticing and so is the fact that multiple sports broadcasters/journalists who I know attended KU. I want to know if in the long run, and to better set me up for a great career in the sports broadcasting industry, would it be worth it for me to attend KU over my in-state options? Or will attending MSU set me up just the same.

    Reply
    • Hi Jackson. Thank you for your message. Terrific question. My answer pains me to write because I am a proud Kansas State University grad. You are right on, though: our arch-rival KU is a terrific destination for aspiring sportscasters. It has been for several decades. You’ll receive quality instruction and lots of on-air reps.They also have a strong, underrated alumni network within the industry. If staying closer to home and/or if the cost savings of attending MSU or Central Michigan is important, you can build a strong foundation for your career at those schools, as well. Michigan State has especially seemed to be on the rise over the past four years or so. I don’t know if that is real, or if it is simply because I’ve been seeing more, polished graduates coming from East Lansing in that time. Bottom line: you’ll get what you need for sportscasting at any of the schools, as long as you put in the work. Therefore, let geography, environment and finances be your guides. Let me know if you have more questions, Jackson. And please let me know where you end up choosing!

      Reply
  • Dayna Winslette
    October 7, 2023 7:17 pm

    My nephew is a high school senior who is interested in going into sports broadcasting. He has experience more behind the camera than in front of it and is trying to decide which he wants to do. We live in Georgia and want to keep him in-state for tuition reasons. Other than UGA (which can be expensive and overwhelming for someone from a small town), what other schools could you recommend for him? If it has a football program (DI, DII, doesn’t matter), even better because he would love to continue playing in college if he can. Thanks in advance for your help!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      October 10, 2023 8:24 am

      Hi Dayna,

      Georgia Southern, Georgia State and Georgia College & State University MIGHT have what your nephew is looking for. Of the three, I am most confident about Georgia Southern because they produce so many broadcasts on ESPN+ that there is a strong chance that students play a role in the production.

      Reply
  • Hey Jon! I am a high school junior and am trying to find a school for sports broadcasting in the southern (warmer climate) of the US. I am more interested in the technical side of broadcasting (camera operating, production) than the face in front of the camera. What are your thoughts about AI and its effects on broadcasting? Also, do you know anything about Sports Documentary making? I am interested in that as well. Thank You!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      October 10, 2023 8:13 am

      Hi Rex. Thank you for visiting our website and leaving a message.

      It’s funny you asked about AI and sportscasting. Just yesterday I stumbled across this article addressing the topic:

      https://thedmonline.com/what-does-the-future-of-sports-broadcasting-look-like/

      One school leaps immediately to mind that fits your interest: TCU. They have modern facilities, a working relationship with FOX Sports Southwest and fabulous instruction led by Chuck LaMendola. Chuck is a great dude. His email address is c.lamendola@tcu.edu. If you contact him to ask him questions, feel free to tell him that I suggested you reach out to him.

      Any school that includes TV among their sports media major will help you develop off-camera skills. Arizona State, Alabama, Georgia and Florida all fit the bill and are in warm weather locations. Perhaps Baylor, too.

      Reply
  • Carl Bernstein
    October 11, 2023 6:19 pm

    What schools in North Carolina would be the best for this? Western Carolina seems like a good area but I don’t know which school would lead me to be a play-by-play announcer best

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      October 12, 2023 8:03 am

      Hi Carl. UNC and Appalachian State are fabulous options. Elon and East Carolina are also worth reviewing.

      Reply
  • Molly Sheeder
    October 17, 2023 6:47 pm

    Stumbled across this looking at options for my daughter who is currently a senior at a tiny high school in west-central PA. She is obviously also interested in Sports broadcasting/journalism/communications. She’s not 100% sure exactly what route she wants to pursue. She’s pretty open to going anywhere. I’m curious if you feel anywhere is better than another for female students wanting to go into this field. Thanks!!!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      October 19, 2023 4:37 pm

      Hi Molly. Thank you for your question. It’s one I’ve not received before. Love it!

      I don’t know of a school whose sportscasting program might be more favorable to women. And fortunately, I certainly have not heard of a school with a program that is unfavorable to women.

      Two women do come immediately to mind who lead the sportscasting departments at their schools. Both are women I have come to personally know over the years and for whom I have great respect:

      1. Olivia Stomski: Director of the Newhouse Sports Media Center at Syracuse.
      2. Beth Haag: Assistant Teaching Professor-Greenlee School of Journalism and Communications at Iowa State.

      Syracuse has had a sports broadcasting major forever. Iowa State is currently preparing for launch of their sportscasting-specific major.

      Kansas University has long been a terrific school for aspiring sportscasters. Ann Brill is their Dean of Journalism and Mass Communications.

      Jamie Lynn Gilbert is the Associate Director of Student Media at North Carolina State.

      Perhaps your daughter might feel that one of those schools is an especially comfortable fit.

      Reply
      • Molly Sheeder
        October 23, 2023 5:36 pm

        Thank you!! Appreciate your quick reply. Thoughts on Penn State for such a major?

        Reply
        • Jon Chelesnik
          October 24, 2023 7:55 am

          Hi Molly. Glad to try to help. Penn State is an outstanding choice. One especially great thing about PSU is their Career Placement and Internship program, led by Bob Martin. They also have a large enough alumni network to be helpful.

          Reply
  • Hi there,
    I am specifically interested in play-by-play sports broadcasting and I wanted to know your recommendation for that area specifically. Also, I noticed Full Sail University was not on the list and I know they have a sports broadcasting program. I wanted to know if you knew about the program there. Thank you for this helpful article.

    Reply
    • The Full Sail program is outstanding. The reason they aren’t on the list is only because they’re not a traditional four-year school. I am usually much against broadcasting “trade schools.” Full Sail, though, is legit — especially for aspiring TV sports anchor/reporters. They seem to crank out far fewer play-by-play broadcasters. Perhaps I’m wrong, though.

      Most of the schools on this list excel at producing play-by-play broadcasters and TV sports anchor/reporters. Perhaps I give the ever so slightest nod to Syracuse, Arizona State and Oklahoma State for RADIO play-by-play (versus streaming). Most all the schools on the list are good with streaming play-by-play folks. (The role of the play-by-play broadcaster is much different when there is no picture).

      Reply
  • Where do you like for Sports Broadcasting Master’s Degree, as delineated from a Communications Master’s program?

    Reply
    • Syracuse is easily the No. 1 Masters program. Any school that has a strong undergrad sportscasting program will also have a strong Masters program, if they offer one.

      I’m not a believer, though, in the value or necessity of a sports broadcasting Masters. This blog post explains why: https://staatalent.com/the-journalism-masters-myth/

      One benefit that isn’t included in the blog post is getting more on-air reps if you need to further polish your craft before hitting the sportscasting job market.

      Reply
  • A person can thrive, and set themself up for post-graduate success, at any of these schools. The thing that will determine the value of the college experience is the degree of effort that is put into it. Schools provide different levels of instruction and on-air opportunities. Deficiencies in either can be made up for through aggressiveness by the individual.

    Instruction not great? Seek outside mentors to critique your work and offer guidance? Not getting the on-air reps you want? Cover games on your own.

    A student will get out of their college experience whatever they put into it.

    Reply
  • Hello
    Thank you so much for this very helpful informative list! Reading the comments have been very useful. I have a son graduating this year and his goal is to attend a school that offers sports broadcasting major. We just toured Husson University in Maine , their program is under what they call the New England School of Communication. Do you have any feedback or knowledge of this program at all?

    Reply
    • Hi Tina. Thank you for your post. And you are welcome! Glad you are enjoying the info on this page.

      I’m not familiar with the New England School of Communication. I wish I could shed some light on it for you.

      Reply
  • Kevin McKinney
    November 8, 2023 11:03 am

    What is the best way or school to obtain an online degree in Sports Broadcasting?
    I am 19 yeasr old and will have to work part time but sports is my passion.

    Reply
    • Hi Kevin! Thank you for your question. I have little faith in most sportscasting trade schools, which is where you would likely find the most feasible online options. Most promise to prepare you for an on-air career but you graduate prepared only to work behind the scenes. Colorado Broadcasting School is an exception, if they offer online. Same with Complete Game Broadcasting in Atlanta. The first one to look at, though, is the Dan Patrick School of Sportscasting through Full Sail University. They have on-campus learning in Florida but they also offer online. Their track record is relatively short but quite impressive in the number of their folks who get on-air jobs upon graduating.

      Reply
  • My daughter is a high school senior who is interested in pursuing a career in sports broadcasting. She wants to attend a school that has a strong program in her chosen field as well, ideally, as having a D1 football and hockey program.
    She has been accepted to Michigan State, Indiana, Ohio State, Penn State (2+2), Quinnipiac and is waiting on a number including Clemson, Syracuse, Maryland, Wisconsin and Virginia Tech.
    Her #1 was Penn State but is not interested starting at a satellite campus. She also loves Ohio State but is concerned that they do not have a sports broadcasting major.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 4, 2024 10:06 am

      Happy new year, Vin. Thank you for your question. Your daughter’s list is impressive! Quinnipiac is the only unusual inclusion if you played the Sesame Street game, “One of these things is not like the others.” A person can be well-prepared for a sportscasting career at a school that doesn’t have a sports broadcasting major. It doesn’t mean those schools don’t still offer the classes required to be well-prepared for a sportscasting career — they just might not all be on the same page in the curriculum guide. With that being said, Ohio State doesn’t crank out as many sportscasters as the other schools on your list. Your list, though, is packed with power hitters.

      Ultimately, a student will get out of it what they put into it, regardless of school.

      Reply
  • Hello,
    Would like to know your thoughts on Quinnipiac, Sacred Heart, High Point, Hofstra, Ithaca & Rowan for sports broadcasting. My son has also attended Play by Play sports broadcasting camps and is undecided about production vs. in front of camera or mic.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 4, 2024 9:58 am

      Thank you for your question, Beth. My reply takes into consideration on-air only, not production. Hofstra easily has the deepest history in sports broadcasting of the schools on your list. Ithaca has been good for years and is only getting better. Jeremy Menard took over their department several years ago and increased their upward trajectory. Quinnipiac has left me unimpressed over the past 12 years or so. Sacred Heart is unremarkable, though they do have a Sports Communication & Media/Broadcasting program. High Point and Rowan aren’t great choices for folks who want to work on-air.

      Reply
  • Hi Jon,
    Do you have any thoughts on Univ of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism’s Sports Broadcasting program? They have a 5 night a week student produced OU Nightly news broadcast with LIVE beat reporting. In addition, students, produce Game Day U and OU Sports Pad on ESPN+. WIth OU joining the SEC in 2024, will the journalism school be higher ranked in the coming year? When touring campus, the Gaylord building outshines Okla State Univ. facilities, which you rank in your rankings. Could you compare which of the two programs has won more student awards and prepares students better for a successful sports broadcasting career ~ Univ of Oklahoma or Oklahoma State? Thank you for your invaluable knowledge and help.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 4, 2024 9:48 am

      Hi Lyndie! Happy new year. Thank you for your question.

      OU is a terrific school for sportscasters. Coincidentally, two OU grads who are members of my organization here at STAA recently accepted new jobs, one in radio, the other in TV. They have a strong alumni network, too. The Gaylord College will likely get stronger with the school’s move to the SEC because students will be able to broadcast games on SEC+.

      Choosing between OU and OSU is hard — both are outstanding. OU’s pending affiliation with SEC+ is important; OSU has long been turning out TV AND radio folks at a rate that is hard to match.

      Reply
  • Alexis Cabrera
    January 4, 2024 7:16 pm

    Hi Jon,
    I’m currently an 8th grader and I have an internship with a local sports reporting person. I have started looking at colleges early and was wondering your thoughts on Clemson and Alabama. I also was wondering of good sports board casting you suggest. Last question what degree do you think is best for a sports board caster.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 5, 2024 12:12 pm

      Hi Alex! Props to you for already starting to think about these things.

      Clemson and Alabama are both strong options for aspiring sportscasters. Both especially excel at preparing TV sports anchor/reporters. I would give a clear edge to Alabama in preparing play-by-play broadcasters.

      Reply
  • My daughter would like to pursue sports broadcasting while playing soccer. She wants to stay closer to home here in AZ but the AZ schools are too close to home. Her sister is at Pitt and we are okay with the east coast but we went to Western Illinois and are surprised they made your list. We have family in Tennessee and Illinois. If affordability and proximity are priority (AZ schools aside) what are your thoughts on Western Illinois, Gonzaga, WSU, and Austin Peay?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 8, 2024 2:17 pm

      Hi Ed. Thank you for your question.

      The Western Illinois is underrated nationally. They aren’t a sportscasters factory but they do provide a solid education under the direction of Willian Hoon, who I believe is still there.

      Gonzaga is strong, especially if your daughter wants to pursue the TV side of sportscasting.

      Washington State is one of the best schools in the West for aspiring sportscasters, both for radio and TV.

      I have great respect for the folks at Austin Peay, especially the person in charge of their curriculum, Barry Gresham However, I don’t see as many of their grads getting on-air jobs in sportscasting as I see from the other three schools.

      Reply
  • Hey there, I am a freshman at the University of Southern Mississippi, and someone who is trying to become a sports commentator recently at the school, I’ve only worked in the press box as a journalist along with interning for Varsity Sports Network back in my hometown of New Orleans. Do you recommend I stick it out for another semester and transfer or should I continue to make a name for myself at the college? I’ve talked to people in the athletic departments at the school who’ve said that I can commentate softball and more in the future, but it doesn’t look certain. Are there any schools that are like Southern Miss that are D1, but not too expensive for me and my family? I’ve made connections with people from ESPN at the moment as well before I get onto campus, so should I also try to reach out to see if they know anyone in that region? Here in Mississippi I’ve just met a former 30 year NHL broadcaster who is more than willing to take me on for his high school football broadcasts, but I’m not sure if that’ll help me out in the long run.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 10, 2024 8:12 am

      Hi Devin. Great questions!

      You can prepare yourself well for a sportscasting career at any school where you can get a lot of reps and critique. Aspiring radio sportscasters should be at a school with a campus radio station; aspiring TV talent should be at a school with a campus TV station. If Southern Miss has what you need in that regard, then you’ll be fine. If they don’t, you can still stay there and create your own play-by-play opportunities with your NHL friend, or doing local high school and/or college games. You can stream them online and make a couple hundred bucks per game selling a few advertisements, you could do them for experience-only if you don’t want to sell, of you can simply attend games regularly and practice into your phone. The demo samples you’ll create to one day send to employers don’t have to come from on-air. Just be sure you are getting regular critiques from various people so you can always be improving.

      Bottom line: best to be at a school with campus radio and TV stations where you can get play-by-play reps, but you can make it work even without that.

      Reply
  • Hello,

    My son is a HS junior and is starting to narrow down schools. He is wanting to go to a community college then transfer to a university. He wants to Wrestle but understands he may not be at university level, which is why he has chose a community college 1st. Do you have any recommendations on a 2 yr college? Also, do you have any camps you would recommend for high school students that would benefit his career path?

    Thanks for sharing.

    Jennifer

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 15, 2024 7:05 am

      Hi Jennifer,

      Thank you for your message. My son is also a high school junior, though not interested in sportscasting.

      There are community colleges across the country that have broadcasting programs. It will be harder to find schools that have sports broadcasting programs, but that’s okay. As long as your son is at a school that has radio and/or TV stations, he can create his own reps. I have no familiarity with which community colleges have such programs except for some in SoCal. Saddleback College in Mission Viejo has exactly what you need. The instructor, Melodie Turori, helped me start STAA. I taught a sports broadcasting class at Palomar College near San Diego. They still have a strong broadcasting program, though I don’t know if they still have anything that is sports-specific.

      The best camps are https://www.playbyplaycamps.com/ and https://www.sportsbroadcastingcamp.com/

      Feel free to ask more questions, if you have them.

      Reply
  • Hi there,

    My daughter is a senior very interested in sports journalism and/or sports broadcasting. She has been accepted by Oregon, ASU, Penn State, Butler, Ohio State and Emerson. Her top choices that she’s still waiting on are Syracuse, Clemson, Virginia Tech and Colorado. What process do you suggest we use to narrow the field and make a decision?

    Thank you!!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 19, 2024 8:38 am

      Hi Kendall! Wow — your daughter has some fabulous options. She can’t go wrong.

      The list is so strong that it would be splitting hairs to parse which ones might be better than others. Instead, she might give more weight to non-broadcasting aspects of each school. Will she enjoy living in that community in both fall and winter? Is it in a part of the country where she wants to be? Cost, of course, is always an important consideration. Does she want to go out-of-state to step outside her comfort zone try something totally new, or might she prefer to stay closer to home? Does she have family or friends in the area that might make the transition to college easier?

      You were probably hoping for advice of how to narrow down the list based upon the impact each school could have on her career. Like I said, though, the list is so strong that she can thrive at any of them.

      One final consideration — there is a great chance that a college grad in any industry will get their first job in the part of the country where they attended school. When you daughter ponders her choices, ask her if she can see herself living in whatever part of the country following graduation.

      Reply
      • Thank you so much for your response – it eases a parent’s mind. She has since been accepted to Colorado and U Mass Amherst, still waiting on a few. We’re off to visit Penn State in a couple of weeks and see where we go from there. Thanks again so much for weighing in!!

        Reply
        • Jon Chelesnik
          January 25, 2024 3:22 pm

          Colorado? They accepted ME back in the day. You might cross off your list any school that was willing to admit me, haha.

          In all seriousness, now, CU is a terrific choice. Congrats to your daughter for being accepted both there and at UMass. If you don’t mind, please let me know how she enjoys her visit to Penn State!

          Reply
          • So, she’s made her decision – she committed to Penn State this weekend. We loved the campus and the school. The communications building is amazing! My understanding is that they had a fairly recent endowment and redid the building and the facilities are just great. We also loved the feel of a big school in a college town. She can’t wait!

          • Jon Chelesnik
            March 21, 2024 2:40 pm

            Hi Kendall. You are awesome for letting me know. Thank you. Congratulations to your daughter on her decision. She will be very pleased she chose Penn State.

            Tell your daughter she can contact me anytime that she wants suggestions or advice related to sports broadcasting. Glad to help! jon@staatalent.com

  • My son is doing the summer Sportcasting program at the University of Mass @ Amherst. Is that considered a strong program? He is a high school sophomore.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      January 25, 2024 7:39 pm

      Hi Sara. Thank you for visiting our website. It’s ironic that you mention UMass. The post immediately prior to yours was from a woman whose daughter is considering UMass. I love having answers for the folks here, but I am unfamiliar with the program in Amherst. It certainly isn’t considered to be among the top programs, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a good program.

      Who will be some of the instructors at their summer sportscasting program?

      Reply
      • Thanks for taking my question- it doesn’t say who is teaching the summer program. The Director of Sports Journalism concentration (under Journalism major) is Greeley Kyle and Steve Fox teaches courses.
        I looked into the Syracuse summer program too, and several of those teachers are U Mass-Amherst alum.

        Reply
        • Hi Sara,

          I asked about the instructors to give me an idea of the summer program’s credibility, since I’m not familiar with it. And it’s interesting that several of the teachers of the Syracuse summer program are UMass-Amherst grads. That surprised me.

          I looked up the UMass program. The curriculum looks strong. If the instructors have themselves worked on-air in sports broadcasting, then it’s probably an outstanding option. My concern with any sports broadcasting curriculum is when it isn’t taught by someone with sports broadcasting experience. Being a former newscaster or radio DJ doesn’t provide for the best sports broadcasting instruction.

          Reply
  • Jon,

    My daughter is a High School Junior and her dream is sports broadcasting, and this list was invaluable to helping her start her college search. We visited Syracuse and Penn State this fall, and the rest of the stops on her list are Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Miami, Arizona State, and St. Cloud State (We are from MN). However, she understands that the road to the dream is a tough one, so she is looking for a school where her preparation would prepare her as well for work in Sports Information or business communications. Any thoughts on the breadth of journalism or communications programs at the schools on the list?

    Reply
    • Hi Ed,

      So glad this list was helpful to your daughter. Thank you for letting me know.

      Her list is a fabulous one. I don’t know, though, which of those schools is especially good at preparing someone with the skills of a sports information director. Missouri cranks out a lot of print media folks, so you might start your investigation there. And any of the schools that have a sports media major likely include writing classes that would be of tremendous value if your daughter chooses the sport info role.

      Regardless of what school she attends, she can work in the school’s sports information department and get all the skills and training she’ll need to impress employers post-graduation.

      Reply
  • I noticed Temple University isn’t showing up in lists but they have a sports media certificate. Do you know anything about that program? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      February 7, 2024 3:46 pm

      Hi Beth. I’ve only become aware of the strength of Temple’s program since I published my most recent list. They would definitely be included today. They’ve cranked out many TV sports anchor/reporters. I’m still of the belief there are better options, though, for someone wanting to be a radio sportscaster. Maybe time will prove me wrong as I was regarding their TV program.

      This is a good example of the fact that, as much as I’ve learned about collegiate sports broadcasting programs over the years, I don’t know everything. I will eagerly continue to share my thoughts but I also encourage folks to remember that I know far from everything.

      Reply
  • Hi Jon,
    I have a 7th grade student who is interested in becoming a sports statistician within the broadcasting field, but not necessarily interested in being the on-air talent. I’m not sure what to search for to help him–what would you recommend in a broad sense for a university program/degree? Would a broadcasting program be a primary goal? He is a very good hockey and basketball player but thinks he’d only be successful in a D-3 school as an athlete. Any ideas?
    I appreciate your thoughts.
    Chris McBride

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      March 8, 2024 10:39 am

      Hi Chris. My goodness, I’m so sorry for my late reply.

      Is your son wanting to keep stats for the broadcasters in the broadcasting booth at games, or is he wanting to be a sports data analytics guy, perhaps working in the front office for a team?

      Reply
      • Chris McBride
        March 12, 2024 9:25 am

        Hi Jon,
        Thank you for getting back to me. My guy wants to work in the front office for a team, let’s say the Boston Bruins or Celtics.

        Reply
      • Chris McBride
        March 14, 2024 11:27 am

        Hello again, Jon,
        Thank you for getting back to me. My guy is excited to hear your thoughts.
        He initially said he’d like to work in the front office of Boston Celtics or the Bruins. . . now he’s saying that he’d like to be in the broadcast booth. Ha! He’s 13. . . . Will you offer direction for either path?

        Reply
        • Jon Chelesnik
          March 15, 2024 10:12 am

          Hi Chris. Even though your son is divided between an on-air or front office sports job, he still has more direction than I did at 13, haha!

          On-air sportscasting options are, of course, the focus of this blog. Sports management schools are generally outside my expertise, though I believe that Rice, Michigan and Florida have strong programs.

          Reply
          • Chris McBride
            March 19, 2024 7:23 am

            Right!? Me too!
            Thank you for your thoughts–especially since half of my question is outside your expertise. You’ve given us a great starting point and words to use in our search.
            Thank you again.
            Chris and Jack

          • Jon Chelesnik
            March 19, 2024 10:33 am

            You are welcome, Chris and Jack. Contact me any time. I’m glad to try to help!

  • Hey Jon, I’m currently a senior in high school looking to commit in the near future for sports journalism/broadcast journalism. I wanted to know your thoughts on the following schools: Mississippi State, Ole Miss, Michigan State and Oklahoma State. Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      March 8, 2024 10:58 am

      Hi Connor! Ironically, I did a Zoom just this week with sportscasting students at Oklahoma State. I have long held their program in high regard, both for aspiring radio and TV sportscasters. Some schools are better at producing one than the other. OSU cranks out both. And if it is play-by-play in which you are interested, the longtime Voice of the Cowboys, Dave Hunsicker, is the instructor. He’s fabulous.

      Michigan State is strong. I didn’t know much about them until recent years but they do a decent job developing sports TV talent. And some radio, too.

      Ole Miss has a good program for aspiring sports TV folks; haven’t noticed as much success on their radio side. I see few sportscasters coming out of MSU. It doesn’t mean they don’t; I just don’t see them.

      Reply
  • My 9th grader is curious about sports broadcasting, and we are in CA. Are there any CA schools worth considering? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      March 8, 2024 11:05 am

      Thank you for your question. I’m in CA, too. And yes, there are certainly schools worth considering. San Diego State is good for aspiring TV talent. Cal-State Fullerton is good. USC, though they don’t have a sports broadcasting major, is outstanding. Their students take great pride in their work Upperclassmen eagerly help underclassmen, then it continues to get passed down.

      Stanford has a growing program. Santa Barbara is worth a look — decent not great, but they provide more than enough for an ambitious student to thrive there.

      Fresno State produces some sportscasters.

      San Jose State is VERY good and Santa Clara has a nice track record in recent years.

      Reply
  • Hi Jon

    Can you share a few reasons for the high ranking of Maryland? My son is choosing between Maryland Penn. State Syracuse and South Carolina for fall 2024. We are aware of the strengths of Syracuse and Penn State as they are both very established programs. The Maryland program seemed much smaller with respect to the concentration of broadcasting. We loved their school though. Can you share a little insight on their strong relative ranking for broadcasting? Thanks!

    Reply
  • My daughter is a high school sophomore and has been showing an interest in a career with sports broadcasting. Would you recommend any camps or mentoring/shadowing programs for her.

    Reply
  • Hey Jon, I recently received acceptances for UMiami and TCU. I’ve done some research on the programs but I wanted to hear your prospective as well. Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      March 15, 2024 10:08 am

      Hi Connor,

      Congratulations on earning those acceptances!

      I have great respect for both schools. TCU is especially contemporary/cutting-edge with their program.

      My observation over 17 years is that Miami excels at preparing folks for sportscasting careers in both radio and TV. TCU seems to specialize in TV. And for anyone wanting to work off-air in sports broadcasting, TCU is hard to beat nationwide.

      Reply
  • Filomena Kappock
    March 24, 2024 9:49 am

    Hi Jon

    My son is currently deciding between several of your recommended sport’s broadcasting programs. He has been accepted by Indiana, Ball State, Ithaca, Fordham and Syracuse. They all have great programs. Ball State has given him the largest scholarship and therefore is the most affordable. We live in NJ so geographically Fordham , Ithaca and Syracuse are closer to home. We of course want to give him the best opportunities in a very competitive field. Any advice?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      March 27, 2024 10:05 am

      Hi Filomena. Thank you for your question. Congratulations to your son on earning acceptance to some of the very best sports broadcasting schools in the country. Wow!

      The first consideration many parents address when helping their child choose a school is the quality of the education they will receive. Each of your son’s options is outstanding in that regard. Affordability and, for some students, proximity to home, are the next considerations. Those might be the factors that will help your son make his choice. And of course if he can visit some of the campuses, there is likely to be one or two that just feel right — that intuition that says, “this feels like where I’m supposed to be.”

      Please let us know where your son ends up attending!

      Reply
  • Hi Jon,

    Do you have recommendations on where we can look or someone we can talk to, for a list of strong schools with more of the sports digital media side of things?

    Thanks for any input,
    Jen

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      April 6, 2024 10:41 am

      Hi Jen. Glad to try to point you in the right direction. When you say “more of the sports digital media side of things,” what specifically within sports media is it that you (or your child) is wanting to do?

      Reply
  • What’s the Gonzaga programs like for broadcasting? I’ve been looking around and i can’t find anything. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      June 18, 2024 9:18 am

      Hi Henry,

      Gonzaga’s sports broadcasting program is solid, especially on the TV side. It’s my observation, though, that it’s not quite as strong as it was 10 years ago. Still very much worth looking at.

      Jon

      Reply
  • Alicia Andersen
    June 17, 2024 9:24 pm

    Hi Jon,
    My son will be a senior next year and has a shot at getting into some overall highly ranked schools. We’re interested in this because of their need-blind financial policies, as we can’t afford to help him with schools. His dream is to be a TV football analyst on camera. How are schools like Princeton, Yale, etc when it comes to going into sports media? He’s under the impression that USC is the best school he can go to for this. I haven’t heard you reference any of these schools, and I’ve gotten the sense that USC isn’t high on your list. It sounds like a sports broadcasting major isn’t as important as other factors. We’ve heard Alabama, Oklahoma, and Georgia are great feeder schools for ESPN…but is that the biggest factor? Do you have any thoughts for us?

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      June 18, 2024 9:23 am

      Hi Alicia,

      My son will also be a high school senior this fall.

      Ivy League schools don’t traditionally produce sportscasters. Exceptions are rare.

      USC is great for general broadcasting. They are currently on a run of great sportscasters over the past five years or so, but it’s more because of a a handful of elite students setting a high bar then pushing each other — and subsequent classes — to achieve it. Super expensive, though.

      There is no such thing as an ESPN feeder school. Well, except for Syracuse. They feed ALL sportscasting outlets, though, haha.

      You said your son wants to be a TV football analyst. For clarification, he wants to be the person who explains WHY a play unfolded as it did, versus being the play-by-play broadcaster who describes the play as it unfolds?

      Jon

      Reply
      • Alicia Andersen
        June 18, 2024 6:11 pm

        In a dream situation he’d end up on a show like Good Morning Football discussing the game. (He’s not afraid to dream big) He loves every aspect of football, talking about it, and being in front of the camera. He’s excited about every career choice that could lead in the direction he’d like to go. Currently, he plays varsity high school football and announces the freshman games, and also has a fantasy football podcast going into its 3rd year. For the size and caliber of school he’s looking at, he doesn’t expect to play in college but he does have a good mind for statistics if that helps reach his goal. Financially USC is a big reach, so we’re trying to compile a well rounded list. Appreciate your thoughts!

        Reply
        • Jon Chelesnik
          June 20, 2024 9:22 am

          There are two roles on a show like Good Morning Football: studio host and analyst. The analyst roles always go to high-profile current or former players and coaches. The best path to hosting a show like that is to learn, then pursue, TV sports anchor/reporter positions. The anchor part is what prepares him to be a studio show host, but sports anchor jobs are almost always paired with reporting responsibilities, especially at entry levels. Another option for devloping hosting skills is on a video podcast. However, his show would have to draw HUGE viewership to grab the attention of high level employers.

          Reply
          • Alicia Andersen
            July 1, 2024 4:18 pm

            Thank you for the clarity – this field is so big and has so many different avenues. As his mom, I wonder about all the possible jobs that he doesn’t even know are out there. His other love besides football is connecting with people and bringing fun and laughter to everything he’s doing, especially if it’s on air. I personally think he might be a great talent agent 😉 and I’m excited for him to see what’s out there in general. I’ll ask this on the off chance – Besides studying sports broadcasting/ sports journalism, does anything else come to mind as a possible major for a kid who’s passionate about sports and especially football, loves interacting with people, has the brain of an analyst, and is often told by others that he should be a lawyer? I ask just in case it makes you think of a certain track in the sports entertainment world. Just looking through your blog has been enlightening, so thank you again!

          • Jon Chelesnik
            July 8, 2024 11:35 am

            Hi Alicia,

            You certainly might be onto something with sports agent. Your suggestion reminds me of a prominent sportscasting agent named Kevin Belbey. Kevin attended Syracuse with the goal of becoming a sportscaster. Several years in, though, he changed paths to become an agent. He’s risen quickly in that industry.

            NFL teams have analytics departments where exceptionally smart people crunch statistical data to help guide personnel decisions. I would guess having a math major would help. Granted, that path would waste your son’s great personality.

            Perhaps your son creates his own niche — an on-camera personality who crunches statistical data on teams and star players, but instead of keeping it private for a single team he shares his findings on platforms like NFL Network FOX Sports, ESPN, etc. He would likely start with his own YouTube channel, hone his craft, attract and audience and build credibility. Then he starts doing guest appearances on various sports media outlets. Then he either makes a living doing that, or by getting hired by one of the major sportscasting outlets. Just an outside the box idea …

  • Hi Jon!

    My name is Erilyn and I’m about to enter my 2nd year of community college and want to pursue a career in sports journalism. My dream school was ASU, but I now want to attend a university in southern california that is good in sports broadcasting. I’m thinking of applying to CSU Fullerton since I’ve heard about their sports media certificate program and was wondering if it’s a good school to attend for sports journalism and if there is any other schools in southern california that are good for sports journalism!

    Reply
    • Jon Chelesnik
      June 26, 2024 7:16 am

      Hi Erilyn. What a pretty name you have! I’m sorry for my delayed reply. I appreciate your question, though.

      CSU Fullerton is a great option! USC is also strong, but quite expensive. San Diego State has a good broadcasting program, though not sports-specific. Fullerton College (not to be confused with CSU Fullerton) used to be strong under the guidance of a man named Ed Ford. If Ed is still there, then Fullerton College is worth a look. Definitely look at Champan University in Orange, too. Oh, and Santa Barbara.

      Reply

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