What to do when you don’t meet minimum requirements

Your perfect next job just opened. The responsibilities fit your strengths; it’s at a station for which you want to work in a market where you want to live…

The catch is that you don’t meet the minimum experience outlined in the position description.

Do you apply anyway?

Yes.

Employers publish minimum requirements so less talented broadcasters will eliminate themselves.

Less confident sportscasters will see minimum experience requirements and think, “I already think I’m not real good yet. The three-to-five year minimum requirement convinces me I’m not going to apply.”

Radio and TV employers are no different than NBA general managers. They care less about where you come from than about how good you are. The NBA drafted Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett from high school even though they didn’t have the college experience teams generally prefer.

If you genuinely believe you can handle the job and can say without bias that you are good enough to work for that employer in that market, apply.

When you DO need to meet the requirements

One exception is major college play-by-play. You have to be good enough, but you also must have a resume that the university can sell to its fans.

What about college graduates?

Do college radio and internship experience count toward minimum experience requirements or am I wasting my time with the application?

Experience on campus radio and TV stations counts only for entry-level jobs. Otherwise, if a position description states that three-to-five years of experience are required, they mean in commercial broadcasting.

If you have just two years in commercial broadcasting but know you are ready for the next step, apply anyway.

Generally, employers want the best people, regardless of experience.