Cripps lands on feet after year of unemployment


“Blake(November 24, 2017) Losing your job unexpectedly is scary. Blake Cripps recently experienced it and, after a year of uncertainty, has landed on his feet. An STAA member, Cripps has joined Rocking M Radio in Wichita and is the new basketball voice at NCAA DII Newman University.

Cripps has been in Wichita radio since 2012. Rocking M Radio, though, is new in the market.

“I have loved working in Wichita,” says Cripps. “It is a vibrant city that is great for people my age. Almost all of my sports connections are here and I will be in a prime position to leverage them as we move forward and establish Rocking M Radio as a Wichita company and brand in the community.”

Cripps’ new opportunity comes one year after being let go by another Wichita station. Initially, he feared that the sportscasting job market would shun unemployed applicants. He was pleased to realize that is not the case.

“I couldn’t have been more wrong,” Cripps says. “I was in the running for several good and/or big jobs despite losing mine completely unexpectedly. That is no time to feel sorry for yourself. Take it as a chip on your shoulder and get to work.”

Finding his next job was less a concern for Cripps than being able to pay his bills. “When you’re unemployed and the balance in your bank account is approaching KU football’s winning percentage, your confidence is not exactly beaming at that moment.

“It is times like that when you need someone in your corner to listen when you need to vent or ask a question to. I’m glad STAA was there for me when I needed it during my rough time.”

Over the past year, Cripps has been a strong candidate for several sportscasting opportunities. Though he didn’t get the jobs, he remained undeterred.

“Sometimes the best candidate is not who gets selected,” he says. “I felt that way about several jobs that I applied for and was in the final 10, final five, or even closer for. Judging broadcasting is exceptionally objective and not getting a job is no reason to doubt yourself.

“Many employers don’t want to hear this, but many decision makers in the radio business are NOT very good at identifying talent and some are exceedingly bad at it,” Cripps says. “Rely on honest colleagues and friends in the business to tell you how you’re doing and what you need to improve on. Employers often make hires based on factors that are totally outside the applicant’s control.”

As for being fired, Cripps has no regrets. “I knew that I had done exactly what had been asked of me to the best of my ability. Even when the money got tight, I slept great because of how much less stress and pressure I was under. There is no employer or job that is worth your unhappiness.

“It was great to hear that the world wasn’t going to end just because you lost your job.”

(Visit Blake’s STAA Talent Page).