10 Actionable Tips To Help You Reach Your Career Goals

If change is worth making, it is worth making right away. There’s no reason to save it for a New Year’s resolution.

2015-goals

Here are 10 actionable tips to help you reach your career goals.

1. Build your team

We all have people we lean on at important times in our lives. Think about who those people are in your life, then use them to help you with important career decisions. It’s likely that not all of your team members will be in the sports broadcasting industry. My team includes my wife, dad and sister, Melodie who is part of our team at STAA, and a couple of friends in broadcasting with whom I have grown close over the years. The people who know you best will keep you moving in the right direction.
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Know How Much Of Your TV Reel Employers Are Watching

Wouldn’t it be awesome if you knew an employer watched your TV reel and for how long they watched it?

tv-demo-reel

You will know these things if you host your reel on YouTube.

YouTube’s analytics provide two key pieces of info about your TV reel:

1. Who is watching

YouTube’s analytics tell you the states from which your reel has been watched and when it was watched. If you applied last week for a job in Dallas and see that someone in Texas watched your reel on Thursday, you can feel confident it was the employer to whom you applied.

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How to be a persistent job seeker without being annoying

Minor League Baseball teams can expect up to 200 applications for Director of Broadcasting and Media Relations positions. Setting yourself apart from such a large crowd can seem impossible. With a solid follow-up strategy, though, you can make yourself stand out.

The key is polite persistence.

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Very few people get jobs without following up their applications, but the squeaky wheel really does get the grease. The trick is being persistent without being annoying, but where do you draw the line?
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The simple solution to job market frustration

Each time an STAA client gets a job, we post their success story on our homepage. The stories serve as motivation to others, and often provide keys for how you can win in the sportscasting job market. One of my all-time favorite success stories is that of Delaney Brey.

Delany went to work for The Media Gateway in Little Rock. What makes her story worth mentioning is that it is a typical story of job market frustration. What sets Delaney apart is that, instead of stubbornly doing the same thing, she made changes.

Here is her story in her words:

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The best time to tell your boss you’re looking elsewhere

job-ads

How do you think it would go over if you told your spouse or your significant other that you were starting to look for someone new? At the very least, it would likely put a strain on the relationship. Worst case, your significant other tells you to get lost.

It works the same in the job market.

The best time to tell your boss that you are looking elsewhere is when you have accepted a job offer.

There is one rare exception that I will get to in a moment. However, if you tell your current employer that you are looking at other opportunities, you run the risk of four things happening – none of them good.
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Are you making this job market mistake?

job-market-mistake

Uh oh…I’ve heard from another sports broadcasting employer who is frustrated by lack of attention to detail from job seekers.

I’ve written posts based on employer feedback before. This is the latest.

While I was disappointed to learn that many of the careless job seekers in this scenario were STAA members, I am glad to have received the comments. The best way to learn about how to apply for broadcasting jobs is to listen to the employers who are evaluating your application.
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6 Common Cover Letter Mistakes

Each month, I probably read at least 30 cover letters from sportscasters looking for jobs.

cover-letter-mistakes

Here are a handful of common mistakes that people are making.

1. Copy and paste

Other than changing the name of the school, some people sent the exact same letter for MSU as they sent for Clemson.

2. Not stating your reason for interest

State in your opening paragraph what is it about that school that is attractive to you. Be sure to make it about them, not about you. Writing, “This would be a good opportunity for me because….” is hurting your letter, not helping.

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Ask Employers For This Instead of a Job

Molly Fletcher is one of the few women in the world of sports agents.

When she was a guest on the Brian Buffini Show podcast, she shared about her days of trying to break into the industry. She told Brian, “My goal at every meeting was to get them to like me enough and respect me enough to either help me or hire me.”

Apply that approach to your sports broadcasting career.

Ask employers for advice, not jobs.

Asking for a job puts an employer on the spot. Asking for advice puts them in the spotlight.

Don’t ask for a job. Ask for advice, and you’ll present yourself as ambitious rather than needy.