Are you making this job market mistake?

job-market-mistake

Uh oh…I’ve heard from another sports broadcasting employer who is frustrated by lack of attention to detail from job seekers.

I’ve written posts based on employer feedback before. This is the latest.

While I was disappointed to learn that many of the careless job seekers in this scenario were STAA members, I am glad to have received the comments. The best way to learn about how to apply for broadcasting jobs is to listen to the employers who are evaluating your application.
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6 Common Cover Letter Mistakes

Each month, I probably read at least 30 cover letters from sportscasters looking for jobs.

cover-letter-mistakes

Here are a handful of common mistakes that people are making.

1. Copy and paste

Other than changing the name of the school, some people sent the exact same letter for MSU as they sent for Clemson.

2. Not stating your reason for interest

State in your opening paragraph what is it about that school that is attractive to you. Be sure to make it about them, not about you. Writing, “This would be a good opportunity for me because….” is hurting your letter, not helping.

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Ask Employers For This Instead of a Job

Molly Fletcher is one of the few women in the world of sports agents.

When she was a guest on the Brian Buffini Show podcast, she shared about her days of trying to break into the industry. She told Brian, “My goal at every meeting was to get them to like me enough and respect me enough to either help me or hire me.”

Apply that approach to your sports broadcasting career.

Ask employers for advice, not jobs.

Asking for a job puts an employer on the spot. Asking for advice puts them in the spotlight.

Don’t ask for a job. Ask for advice, and you’ll present yourself as ambitious rather than needy.

One Major Market PD’s Pet Peeve About Job Seekers

My parents gave me a lot of advice when I was growing up. Much of it I ignored, thinking they were wrong or that I simply knew more than them. Sometimes, though, when a coach or the parent of a friend gave me the same advice, I ran with it because it came from a different voice. Trying to help our members at STAA is sometimes the same way.

I have preached ‘til I’m blue in the face that cookie-cutter cover letters – form letters – do not work in the job market. Alas, not all of our members at STAA respect the message. I received the following email this week from the Program Director at a one of the nation’s most prominent sports radio stations.
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How to Get Your Next Sports Broadcasting Job by Being Different

An aspiring sportscaster living in Los Angeles saw an opening for a sports talk radio producer in South Carolina. He badly wanted the job in order to get his foot in the industry. Instead of mailing or emailing his resumé to the employer, he hopped on a plane and hand-delivered it. They were so impressed with his gumption that he got the job.

That aspiring sportscaster was Jonas Knox, who ended up being a sports talk host with Fox Sports Radio Network.
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