Two tricks for handling sportscaster burnout


When is the last time you felt burned out in your career?

sportscaster burnout

A friend sent this message to me. “I’m a one-man band at my station — sports anchoring and reporting. I’m wearing myself out ensuring that I have plenty of local content each night. What can I do?”

I had two suggestions for him, one practical and the other mental.
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How to sell yourself in your cover letter


Recently, I reviewed the cover letter of someone who was applying for a radio sports update anchor/reporter position. He wrote that he is a hard working team player, that he hosts a weekly sports talk show, and that he does sports updates and reporting for his local station.

He blew it in multiple ways.
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12 of the nicest guys in sportscasting


Recently, I heard an old story about a TV producer. He was telling a friend that he had worked a game with a talented young broadcaster who was also uncommonly selfless and a great team player. The young man was quick to ask accommodating questions like, “If I sit this way, does it work for you?”

The broadcaster was Bob Costas. His kindness had made a great impression on the veteran producer.

The story got me thinking about some of the most pleasant sports broadcasters I have met — guys whose kindness I have experienced first-hand.

Here they are in no particular order…
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3 takeaways from the firing of Wake Forest’s broadcaster


Last week, I was asked on a sports talk radio show if I thought that coaches would be less trusting of broadcasters following the Tommy Elrod incident at Wake Forest. My reply was a definitive “no.”

Hundreds of thousands of sportscasters have served on the broadcast teams for high school, college and pro teams. Elrod is the first we’ve ever heard about sharing information with opponents. Just because one person betrays us doesn’t mean we stop having friends.

The Elrod incident started me thinking about three questions regarding the broadcaster-coach relationship.
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What’s the coolest place your sportscasting mike has taken you?


This month, a friend of mine emailed me from Hawaii. He had just broadcast three basketball games, his team won the tournament and he got to hang out at the beach. In December. It was a pretty awesome work trip.

sportscasting travel

His story started me reminiscing about the best places my sports broadcasting career took me. Places like Pocatello and Des Moines were interesting because they were so different from my home turf in San Diego. However, Idaho’s snow and Iowa’s mosquitos that were the size of small Volkswagens were ultimately forgettable.
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Want new career opportunities? Accept this challenge


Running STAA is a lot like being a bar tender.

For whatever reason, many people are comfortable sharing their career and life challenges with me. I appreciate their trust in me; they know that anything they say to me stays with me.

glass-half-empty

The reason I share this is because many of the sportscasters I talk to are “glass half empty” guys. If they would simply flip their perspective and be grateful for what they DO have, new opportunities would start to come their way.
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How to kill your cover letter


There is a common mistake that many people make in their cover letter than can instantly kill their sports broadcasting job application. I’m reminded of it by the following message from an employer who had recently hired a play-by-play broadcaster for his university.

“A friendly reminder to all job applicants: Please include something, ANYTHING, on why they would either like to work for me, or for [our university]. It is staggering, and disconcerting, how many applications I have received which don’t do that.”

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