6 tips for maintaining a happy sportscasting home

You are a basketball play-by-play broadcaster. You’re married and you have at least one child who would love nothing more than for you to be at home to play with tonight. The team for which you are broadcasting is playing on the road in a post-season tournament. Lose and you go home. Win, and you are spending another night in a Holiday Inn.

Your team won. What do you hear in your child’s voice when you tell him you aren’t coming home for at least another day?

Sports broadcasting can be an incredible and fulfilling career. Like anything, though, there are challenges. Days, or even weeks, away from family are difficult. Feeling like your spouse might think you aren’t pulling your weight around the house, or with the kids, can strain a marriage.

What are you doing to cope?
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10 things that are awesome about being a sports broadcaster

We spend a lot of time on this blog offering suggestions about how to make frustrating situations better. If I were an alien from outer space scrolling through for the first time, I might think that sports broadcasting isn’t such a great profession.

But it IS a great profession.
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Life forcing you to move? How to find work in your new home

A sportscaster I know is stressing. His wife is the primary breadwinner in the family. She has accepted a position that is forcing their family to move to another state. His anxiety stems from having no sportscasting work lined up for himself in their new city.

Another broadcaster friend of mine moved back to his hometown to help his aging parents.

finding work when you move cities

What do you do when you are forced to leave full-time or freelance sports broadcasting gigs for life in a community where nothing awaits you professionally?
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Don’t lose it: 6 tips for taking care of your voice

As a broadcaster, there are bound to be many times in your career where your voice feels weak or tired. Maybe you are doing play-by-play for multiple games each day at a tournament, you're hosting a three or four hour talk show, or you are anchoring a sportscast when you are feeling under the weather.

taking care of your voice

Here are six top tips for taking care of your voice:
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Two tricks for handling sportscaster burnout

When is the last time you felt burned out in your career?

sportscaster burnout

A friend sent this message to me. “I’m a one-man band at my station — sports anchoring and reporting. I’m wearing myself out ensuring that I have plenty of local content each night. What can I do?”

I had two suggestions for him, one practical and the other mental.
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5 tips for your sportscasting growth plan

There’s no such thing as maintaining. Not in your personal life, your fitness or your sports broadcasting career.

If you aren’t progressing, you’re going backward.

These 5 tips will ensure you are moving forward in your sportscasting career:
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How to sell yourself in your cover letter

Recently, I reviewed the cover letter of someone who was applying for a radio sports update anchor/reporter position. He wrote that he is a hard-working team player, that he hosts a weekly sports talk show, and that he does sports updates and reporting for his local station.

He blew it in multiple ways.
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What’s the coolest place your sportscasting mike has taken you?

A friend of mine emailed me from Hawaii one winter. He had just broadcast three basketball games, his team won the tournament and he got to hang out at the beach. In December. It was a pretty awesome work trip.

sportscasting travel

His story started me reminiscing about the best places my sports broadcasting career took me. Places like Pocatello and Des Moines were interesting because they were so different from my home turf in San Diego. However, Idaho’s snow and Iowa’s mosquitos that were the size of small Volkswagens were ultimately forgettable.
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Want new career opportunities? Accept this 90-day challenge

Running STAA is a lot like being a bar tender.

For whatever reason, many people are comfortable sharing their career and life challenges with me. I appreciate their trust in me; they know that anything they say to me stays with me.

glass-half-empty

The reason I share this is because many of the sportscasters I talk to are “glass half empty” guys. If they would simply flip their perspective and be grateful for what they DO have, new opportunities would start to come their way.
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How to kill your cover letter

There is a common mistake that many people make in their cover letter that can instantly kill their sports broadcasting job application. I’m reminded of it by the following message from an employer who had recently hired a play-by-play broadcaster for his university.

“A friendly reminder to all job applicants: Please include something, ANYTHING, on why they would either like to work for me, or for [our university]. It is staggering, and disconcerting, how many applications I have received which don’t do that.”

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