Life forcing you to move? How to find work in your new home


A sportscaster I know is stressing. His wife is the primary breadwinner in the family. She has accepted a position that is forcing their family to move to another state. His anxiety stems from having no sportscasting work lined up for himself in their new city.

Another broadcaster friend of mine moved back to his hometown to help his aging parents.

finding work when you move cities

What do you do when you are forced to leave full-time or freelance sports broadcasting gigs for life in a community where nothing awaits you professionally?
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Setting yourself apart from other white male TV talent


I am proud of the advances the TV broadcasting industry has made in diversity hiring. There are countless more opportunities today for women, African-Americans, Hispanics and Asians. That is a great thing.

Interestingly, the diversification of our industry has prompted a challenge that didn’t used to exist.

tv talent

A white male TV sportscaster I know is looking for an agent. He is supremely talented, yet the agents keep telling him the same thing, “I’ve already got five guys just like you.” He asked me how he can set himself apart from other white male sports anchor/reporters.

This is not the first time I’ve heard such a conundrum.
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Don’t lose it: 4 tips for taking care of your voice


As a broadcaster, there are bound to be many times in your career where your voice feels weak or tired. Maybe you are doing play-by-play for multiple games each day at a tournament, you're hosting a three or four hour talk show, or you are anchoring a sportscast when you are feeling under the weather.

taking care of your voice

Here are four top tips for taking care of your voice:
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Two tricks for handling sportscaster burnout


When is the last time you felt burned out in your career?

sportscaster burnout

A friend sent this message to me. “I’m a one-man band at my station — sports anchoring and reporting. I’m wearing myself out ensuring that I have plenty of local content each night. What can I do?”

I had two suggestions for him, one practical and the other mental.
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How to sell yourself in your cover letter


Recently, I reviewed the cover letter of someone who was applying for a radio sports update anchor/reporter position. He wrote that he is a hard working team player, that he hosts a weekly sports talk show, and that he does sports updates and reporting for his local station.

He blew it in multiple ways.
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12 of the nicest guys in sportscasting


Recently, I heard an old story about a TV producer. He was telling a friend that he had worked a game with a talented young broadcaster who was also uncommonly selfless and a great team player. The young man was quick to ask accommodating questions like, “If I sit this way, does it work for you?”

The broadcaster was Bob Costas. His kindness had made a great impression on the veteran producer.

The story got me thinking about some of the most pleasant sports broadcasters I have met — guys whose kindness I have experienced first-hand.

Here they are in no particular order…
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3 takeaways from the firing of Wake Forest’s broadcaster


Last week, I was asked on a sports talk radio show if I thought that coaches would be less trusting of broadcasters following the Tommy Elrod incident at Wake Forest. My reply was a definitive “no.”

Hundreds of thousands of sportscasters have served on the broadcast teams for high school, college and pro teams. Elrod is the first we’ve ever heard about sharing information with opponents. Just because one person betrays us doesn’t mean we stop having friends.

The Elrod incident started me thinking about three questions regarding the broadcaster-coach relationship.
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