Page 1 of 1

ANNOUNCER LINGO

Posted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 5:00 pm
by ssteve
On the ESPN Thursday night college game, Adam Amin (who I think is outstanding) said a player "records the t.f.l." instead of simply saying he recorded the tackle for loss. I knew what he meant, most all of us reading this do, but does every viewer? I doubt it. I cringe a little when announcers use football speak that may go above the average fan. Another one is when they refer to linebackers as the "mike", "sam", or "will". Again, does everybody know what those mean? It's, to me, much smarter and safer to go ahead and call those terms by their real name and not leave anyone wondering what you just referenced.
On a side note, if anyone can explain to me what "catching the ball at it's highest point", or "high pointing" means, I am in year 10 or so of still not knowing what that means as the phrase is worded. I realize what has happened when they use it, but am clueless as to how those words describe it.

Re: ANNOUNCER LINGO

Posted: Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:12 am
by pbpisfun
High-pointing a ball is catching a high throw at the highest point of your jump. Timing is crucial in doing so.

Re: ANNOUNCER LINGO

Posted: Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:11 pm
by Ssteve1969
What I hear, unless I’m missing something, is “he catches the ball at IT’s highest point.” That’s what I haven’t understood.

Re: ANNOUNCER LINGO

Posted: Mon Oct 07, 2019 10:11 am
by pbpisfun
Ssteve1969 wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:11 pm
What I hear, unless I’m missing something, is “he catches the ball at IT’s highest point.” That’s what I haven’t understood.
No, they say he high pointed the ball, meaning he caught the ball at the highest point of his jump. Obviously, it would be impossible to catch the ball at its highest point on almost every pass a QB throws. So, you've misunderstood what they're saying.

Re: ANNOUNCER LINGO

Posted: Mon Oct 07, 2019 4:01 pm
by Ssteve1969
Thanks. I feel like I’ve heard “catches it at it’s highest point” too over the years.